Is Creativity Being Strangled?

By  |  0 Comments

Larry Lessig gets TEDsters to their feet, whooping and whistling, for this elegant presentation of “Three stories and an argument”.

The Net’s most adored lawyer brings together John Philip Sousa, celestial copyrights, and the “ASCAP cartel” to build a case for creative freedom. He pins down the key shortcomings of our dusty, pre-digital intellectual property laws, and reveals how bad laws beget bad code.

Then, in an homage to cutting-edge artistry, he throws in some of the most hilarious remixes you’ve ever seen.

N.B (This talk, like all TED.com’s content, is licensed under Creative Commons — which Larry created.) (Recorded March 2007 in Monterey, California. Duration: 19:07.)

Lawrence Lessig

No expert has brought as much fresh thinking to the field of contemporary copyright law as has Lawrence Lessig. A Stanford professor and founder of the school’s Center for Internet and Society, this fiery believer foresaw the response a threatened content industry would have to digital technology -- and he came to the aid of the citizenry. As corporate interests have sought to rein in the forces of Napster and YouTube, Lessig has fought back with argument -- take his recent appearance before the U.S. Supreme Court, fighting the extension of copyright protection from 50 to 70 years -- and with solutions: He chairs Creative Commons, a nuanced, free licensing scheme for individual creators. Lessig possesses a rare combination of lawerly exactitude and impassioned love of the creative impulse. Applying both with equal dedication, he has become a true hero to artists, authors, scientists, coders and opiners everywhere.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.


*

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This

Share this post with your friends!